Quick Tip:
The Power of Positivity

It’s better to say "an intelligent reader would understand …" than to say "only an idiot could read this and think … "

It’s true that negative statements have more immediate impact. But you run a substantial risk of diverting the attention of anyone who’s reading or listening to your words, alienating them … or incurring plots on your life.

When you phrase negative thoughts in a positive way, you communicate to people better. They accept what you have to say more readily. It also improves your soul.

Caution: I am not talking about sugarcoating here. If you have something critical to say, say it directly. But when you have the option of delivering criticism in a positive context, do so. It will not only work better, it will also make you feel better.

[Ed. Note: This brief was taken from Michael Masterson’s daily email service, Early to Rise. For a free subscription, simply visit http://www.earlytorise.com/.

And while you’re there, click the animated heading at the top of the page to see why Michael Masterson’s book "Automatic Wealth" has been at the top of Amazon’s list since it first came out.]

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Published: December 23, 2002

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