Quick Tip:
Give Your Sales Letter Built-In Credibility With Endnotes

When you make specific claims in your copy about performance or effectiveness – especially in health-related and financial promotions – you MUST have supporting documentation (e.g., from professional journals, company reports, etc.).

Your client needs (and expects) this documentation so he can be sure what he’s mailing is truthful and legal.

The best place to provide this kind of information is in endnotes rather than footnotes. Footnotes can distract your reader from the copy and disrupt the sale.

Here’s how to make endnotes in Microsoft Word:

  1. In the copy, click where you want the first endnote reference number to appear.
  2. Go to “Insert” on your menu bar at the top of the screen.
  3. Go from Insert > Reference > Footnote.
  4. Unclick “Footnote” and click the “Endnote” button.
  5. For “Number Format,” select “1, 2, 3 .”
  6. Click “Insert.”

The endnote number is automatically inserted in your document. A window at the bottom of the document opens. Type in your documentation information (e.g., reference to a journal article).

After making that first endnote, the procedure is streamlined.

And then, when you move or delete an endnote, the numbers are automatically changed.

This may look complicated, but it’s very easy once you do it a couple of times.

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Published: October 23, 2006

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