Web Copy Workshop Day 2 With Nick Usborne

Dear Fellow AWAIer,

What a day! I’ve already landed a $5,000 web copy assignment from another new client.

And that’s actually small potatoes compared to what I learned from Nick Usborne today. Boy did he over-deliver on his promise to show us more about online copywriting than 99.9% of our competitors know.

Even though we’re here learning how to write good web copy, Nick quickly touched on just how big the opportunity is for web copywriters. He stressed the importance of building your copywriting career the right way – from the very start! I felt this topic was just too important not to share with you …

After showing us just how much “bad web copy” is out there these days, he explained how to get all the new clients we could possibly want. He then went on to explain that to make big money as a web copywriter, you need to think more like an architect, and become knowledgeable in all aspects of the web copy structure.

In his analogy he said most web copywriters take the role of laborer when it comes to writing copy for a website. Similar to what a drywall installer or a plumber does in a new home. Each is only concerned with his singular role, not paying any attention to what other laborers add to the collective end.

In order to seize the greatest opportunities, you want to become less like a laborer and more like an architect. The architect knows more than anyone. He knows what the house will look like, who will buy it, and what they’ll pay for it.

Just like the architect, you need to be able to understand the big picture of any website you’re writing copy for. You don’t need to be a web expert in every area, but you should have a general understanding of how everything works.

According to Nick:

“If you simply write pages in isolation, without any regard as to how that page fits with the surrounding pages — or the site as a whole — you’ll never do great work. On a website, every page is connected to others. So a page needs to be written within the context of those connected pages. It also needs to be written with an understanding of the visitor experience as he or she works through those web pages.”

Which leads me to another gem …

Now that you’re thinking more like an architect, here’s a quick tip for getting more web work from your clients. When a client asks you to re-write a landing page, you answer yes. And then respond with: How does this page impact the other pages of the website?

It’s a simple way to increase your project fee from a single client.

Bottom line: Become a specialized web copy architect … your client will get better results … and you’ll get more work. Today’s lesson is another win/win!

Since you weren’t able to be here in Tampa this week, I highly recommend you purchase Nick’s program. I purchased it earlier this year and can tell you it, too, over-delivers on its promise. AWAI has even agreed to give you a special discount this week in light of the Web Copywriting Workshop.

Until tomorrow …

Laurie Cauthen
AWAI Copywriter and Roving Reporter

https://www.awai.com/webcopythatsells/

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Published: August 6, 2008

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