Maximum Web Writing Income
With Minimum Work

Today I'd like to share with you a little insight I picked up from Nick Usborne, web-writing guru extraordinaire.

And for those of you who don't know, Nick's such an expert at web marketing and copywriting that he's been brought in by Disney, Yahoo, and Microsoft to teach their marketing execs a thing or two about how to market better on the web. Frankly, I listen and take seriously everything Nick has to say about the business of writing web copy.

This is something Nick has repeated often about how to make maximum web writing income with minimum work. It's about how to identify those web projects you can do that will be the most value to your clients. By targeting these projects, you're providing more value for your clients. And when you provide more value for your clients, they're willing to pay you more.

Nick's Little "High Income" Web Writing Secret

Okay, so I'm not going to beat around the bush on this one.

Here's Nick's secret (that I've had a lot of success applying as well) …

"Go where the money is."

Okay, so this sounds a little cryptic, and maybe Yoda-ish at first. But once I explain, it'll become perfectly clear.

You see, there are a lot of types of web writing:

  • Article and SEO writing
  • Home pages
  • Product descriptions
  • Landing pages
  • Online press releases
  • Sales pages
  • Email marketing and autoresponders
  • E-Newsletters
  • Blogs
  • PPC ads

The list could go on. So what's most important to work on for a client? What should you specialize in? What's going to earn you the most moolah?

Well here's how you use Nick's criteria to find out.

First, look at how direct the path is between what you're writing and the customer making a purchase. How close is what you're writing to the sale?

Product pages and sales pages? That’s a very direct path. Read the sales page, click "Order Now," fill out payment information, and place the order.

Blog posts or SEO articles? Not as direct a path. Sure, someone could come to the site as a result of your SEO article, read the article, click through to a product page, click "Order Now," and go through the checkout process. But is your SEO article the most important part of that equation, or is something else?

The closer you are to the sale, the easier it is to track results. And the easier it is for the client to track the results of what you write online, the easier it becomes for them to see your value. Then when they see you provide a high value service to their bottom line, they can justify paying you more.

One caveat to this is that many clients – particularly marketing-savvy clients – also place tremendous value on new leads. So if you can do a landing page that converts a high number of visitors to subscribers to their email list, they can see a lot of value in this. This is a different type of sale, as no cash changes hands – but it's valued like a sale because of the future value of those leads.

So if you want to make high income as a web writer, the best way to do that is to "go where the money is," as near to the sale as possible, and work on those projects for your clients.

(On the extreme end of this spectrum, this is why many of the best direct marketing copywriters in the world work almost exclusively on sales letters – because these are often the projects that are closest to the sale.)

The One Big Exception That Earns You Even More

Nick's the first to admit though, his clients need more that just sales copy. In fact, there are dozens of types of copy that all contribute to the sale – indirectly or directly.

And while they place high value on those pieces of copy that are close to the sale – such as product pages, sales pages, and landing pages – they place an even higher value on a complete system for getting customers.

This may involve any combination of 10 or more pieces of web copy, including SEO articles, PPC ads, landing pages, white papers or special reports, product pages, sales pages, autoresponder sequences, email copy, banner ads, and more.

That can seem quite daunting to even the most savvy, experienced client. The thought going through their head is, "Well, it's great this guy (or gal) is willing to write the sales page … But who am I going to get to do everything else?!"

Here's where you can be their savior – and build your value and income to boot.

If you can step up and put together the entire web marketing system – from traffic generation to lead nurturing to making the sale – the client sees tons of value in this.

This moves you from service provider … to solution provider. And solutions have real value. Because the client is no longer thinking about how to mix and match copy and creative from two, three, five, or more different freelancers. They're no longer thinking about the exhausting process of juggling relationships with all these people.

Now – because you're a solution provider – your client can turn to you as their first and last source of what they need to build their online marketing system.

It makes their life easier.

And that's real value.

Worth paying for.

And the good news is once you've put the effort into defining a direction for the marketing and doing the sales materials closest to the sale, all the other work is faster and easier. You can churn out high-quality work on these other items in no time flat.

So if you want to create maximum income from your web writing business, in minimum time and with minimum effort … "Go where the money is." And on top of that … Become a solution provider. It's what Nick does. It's what I've been doing. And if you do it too, you'll quickly realize what a difference it can make in your success.

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Published: December 14, 2010

1 Response to “Maximum Web Writing Income With Minimum Work”

  1. Thanks for the useful information. Being the go-to person is the place to be; it's a bit difficult getting there though. :)

    Guest (Karen Cioffi)December 15, 2010 at 7:43 pm


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