Work With the Mistake

Welcome back. For the past few days, we’ve learned some improv techniques to get you writing now.

Loralei here, back today to talk with you about a taboo subject … mistakes.

Improv is full of mistakes. That’s usually why the show is funny.

Mistakes are a good thing. Improv actors create something new from mistakes. They make it part of the skit. They use it to their advantage.

Now, as a copywriter, you’re going to stumble sometimes.

But I want to teach you something from improv (with some help from AWAI) that’ll shorten your learning curve and get you to the top faster.

Ready?

Learn from the best.

I know … simple, right?

Improv actors constantly learn new techniques from experienced masters of the craft.

AWAI does the same thing – in every one of their programs.

The best of the best are teaching you what they’ve learned and are coaching you every step of the way – so you get all their gold nuggets and you’ll make fewer mistakes. You get this with any AWAI program. But, if you want to begin now, here’s a great way to get started:

Copy the masters. The AWAI Accelerated Program for Six-Figure Copywriting comes with a resource goldmine of copywriting masters. It’s called the Hall of Fame book. Chock full of successful copy examples, you have the chance to learn from Mark Morgan Ford (you might know him under his former pen name, Michael Masterson), Bob Bly, Don Mahoney, and many others. Truly the best of the best.

Choose one of these letters a week. Read it. Copy it. Dissect it. What makes it so powerful? What are the emotions in it? Why does it work?

For me, the letter that was a game changer was the one written for Omaha Steaks International. I know, it’s ironic that a vegetarian like me would love a letter selling steaks. But I did. For two reasons …

The first reason is because the offer didn’t have anything to do with steaks. The company offered a calculator, of all things.

The second was it listed features instead of benefits … when all along I’d thought the key was to focus on selling the benefits. But, by studying this example, I realized that features, not benefits, solve a prospect’s issues, concerns, or fears.

The Omaha Steaks letter changed the way I thought about writing copy, much like improv taught me to see and approach life differently.

I’d love to know what you’ve learned from analyzing copy from the masters.

Share with me here.

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Published: January 23, 2014

2 Responses to “Work With the Mistake”

  1. Loralei, I don't see how an ad from Omaha Steaks worked very well by focusing on a calculator and the features inherent in that calculator. Do you have any data on how well that ad worked, or was it satisfying on a personal level? And, did you buy anything from them? That's the real test if the ad works, agreed?

    Al ColonJanuary 23, 2014 at 2:20 pm

  2. I'm enjoying your Improv series Loralei!

    One thing I noticed copying the letters in the AWAI Accelerated Program for Six-Figure Copywriting program is how the writers used story to great effect within their letters.

    Anthony SJanuary 23, 2014 at 3:51 pm


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