Self-Study with Your Brain Firing on All Cylinders


Will Newman

Several weeks ago, we talked about the opportunities Business-to-Business copywriting offered both new and veteran copywriters. At that time, quite a few readers told me they were considering B2B as a career.

One particular comment struck home for me. Maria said how eager she was to enter this exciting, new (for her) field. She also had a question: How to get started?

I’m sure my answer resonated with many of our readers: Learn the foundational secrets and strategies so you can become competent and confident.

This exchange got me thinking about you. I have so much respect for you. You’re taking control. You’re claiming the writer’s life by studying what needs to be studied. (In Maria’s case, Steve Slaunwhite’s B2B program.)

You see, I can remember back 20 years when I decided to change careers. There was no AWAI in those days … and no real training materials for learning the secrets of copywriting. Even with a mentor, I felt very much alone. I had no idea if what I was doing to teach myself did any good at all.

Studying on your own brings challenges … challenges I had to muddle through. But over the years — largely due to my association with AWAI and becoming the Circle of Success Master Instructor — I’ve learned basic secrets for boosting your self-study success.

And that’s what I want to share with you today and tomorrow: the three most essential Self-Study Success Secrets. Today, though, we’re only going to talk about the first one.

Self-Study Success Secret #1:
Harness as many learning pathways as possible …

This first success secret I should have realized when I began my quest to be a copywriter. I’d used it many times during the 25 years I taught severely disabled children. And I’ve used it when tutoring the “regular-ed kids” who’ve come to me when they needed an academic boost.

This secret is based on the reality that different people learn different ways. Some of us learn best by reading. Some by hearing. Some by taking notes. And some of us learn best by doing.

But there’s more to this. Educational research shows that regardless of how you learn best, you increase your chances of success when you study using different methods.

Educational jargon calls this “harnessing differing learning modalities.” (Leave it to educators to find a complicated way of saying something.) This really means when you use all the pathways into your brain, you learn faster and the material becomes easier to use.

AWAI programs — like Steve’s B2B program — have this concept built into their structures. That's why, in addition to having you read the material, they also provide additional study aids like exercises and bonus webinars. These materials help you learn using different pathways into your brain.

So, as you’re studying what you need to know to grab the writer’s life, employ the first Self-Study Success Secret. Use as many different learning pathways as you can: Read. Listen. Watch. And take notes.

Tomorrow, we’ll talk about our last two essential Self-Study Success Secrets. Until then, let me know how your quest for the writer’s life is going. Which learning methods work best for you? Tell us by commenting below.

B2B Copywriting Secrets

Secrets of Writing High Performance B2B Copy

Learn everything you need to know to succeed as a B2B copywriter from marketing your services to writing copy and everything in between. Learn More »


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Published: April 7, 2016

20 Responses to “Self-Study with Your Brain Firing on All Cylinders”

  1. I use voice recorder sometimes before I write.It can be played back and helps me organize my thoughts.Great article!

    Guest (Nadine)April 7, 2016 at 2:43 pm

  2. I agree that different approaches to learning are beneficial. Once I get past the frustration of having to do things differently I do think faster because I have more avenues to thinking.

    Guest (Alia Curtis)April 7, 2016 at 3:28 pm

  3. Reading method is what I preffer most when studying.My mind does absorb item after item perfectly when I read. This is to let you know Mr. Newman that every email that I receive from you is very educative especially to a new writer like me. Kudos!

    Guest (James Murunga from Nairobi Kenya)April 7, 2016 at 3:42 pm

  4. I learn best by doing.

    Guest (Ik)April 7, 2016 at 4:13 pm

  5. I really look forward to something new everyday on AWAI. The learning path that works for me. Thanks so much for your post.

    Guest (Eunice)April 7, 2016 at 5:18 pm

  6. Hello, I like to write and I have most expectancies about to learn how to become a good writer, however i do not speak english fluently, because I am a latin man, living in Chile. Could you tell me please how can I do to study your material in Spanish please??

    Thanks for your time and interest. I will be waiting for your suggestions.

    [FROM WILL: Please contact member services and have them email me your concerns about language. I have suggestions but they'll take more space than I have here.]

    Guest (Help please)April 7, 2016 at 6:51 pm

  7. I agree. I use them all. I read, listen and watch ---- I take notes with all three.

    JudyP1946April 7, 2016 at 8:31 pm

  8. Thank you for sending this particular Email to me. I found this very interesting. I learn visually, auditory and with a kenetic base. I am a big note taker. I am anxiously awaiting your next Email. Thank You.
    Rob

    Guest (Rob)April 7, 2016 at 8:59 pm

  9. Mr. Newman:

    Thank you for your input. I am very impressed with the system and how it all works at AWAI. I am not sure if I want to go down this path, though. It sounds like it is too expensive for me right now. I just want to give you some feedback.

    Thank you,

    Fred Shannon

    Guest (Fred Shannon)April 7, 2016 at 10:38 pm

  10. Hi there, just wanted to thank you for those words today. Its just a reminder that I'm doing it right, always thought I was a little different.

    Jim BApril 7, 2016 at 11:23 pm

  11. Reading followed by writing down main points thereafter strengthens the learning process.

    JR PaiApril 8, 2016 at 5:21 am

  12. When I was a junior in college, I learned (by accident) that when I re-wrote my notes right after classes, I would remember everything. I'd never need to study for tests, and had a 4.0 - straight A - average through the rest of college and graduate school. I still do that today when I want to learn and remember. My memory isn't quite what it was when I was 20-25, but transcribing my notes still helps.

    JulieInCaryApril 8, 2016 at 1:37 pm

  13. Thank you for the helpful articles. I apparently learn by running down rabbit trails. This is a new world for me. I began by working the 6 Figure Course. I soon found unfamiliar terms and concepts. So I tracked down what I was missing. I read Master copywriters books, internet info, watched videos, and anything I could find about the topic. Returning to the course, I had a firmer grasp on the lesson and confidently moved ahead. Repeat.It's probably the long way around but it's working for me.

    Guest (Bonita Mosley)April 8, 2016 at 5:11 pm

  14. Listening and taking notes were my usual strategies to learning. Now I will use all the pathways and learn faster.
    I just experimented on it and the result is awesome. This is a great concept.
    Thanks Will.

    Guest (Osaze Ehigiator)April 9, 2016 at 4:42 pm

  15. I personally utilize all three methods; read, listen AND doing. I cover all the bases and find this great right now while I master Word 2010. I intend on joining AWAI and taking the course on starting your own resume writing business.

    Guest (Thomas Arillotta)April 10, 2016 at 9:53 am

  16. Hi: I am a person that learns by hearing in repetition. The words to songs, names of people, and even my day to day trade, which by the way, is pressing pants. The practice of reading 10 times and writing three gets a little tedious, and to date I have completed the 2 letter exercises in lesson one; but "WOW" how that stimulated my understanding of what I was reading and gave me strong ideas as to which words I would use if I were actually writing those letters. Exciting!

    Guest (Monica)April 10, 2016 at 6:24 pm

  17. I am new to AWAI but in the past, I learned to record speakers talks to play back later. I took notes. had discussions and circled, underlined and stared important notes. It's got to work again! Susan

    Guest (Susan Robe)April 12, 2016 at 12:37 pm

  18. Yes indeed, "harness as many learning pathways as possible." Just like the observer-dependent framework of our reality. Perpetually bridging being's grounded gravity of NOW and becoming's flight w/ ETERNAL light.

    Guest (Chris Morris)April 12, 2016 at 1:57 pm

  19. I have always learned by reading, listening, taking notes and doing. I, also, enjoy highlighting and underlining what I feel is important or noteworthy.

    Theresa Kusumah-AtmadjaApril 13, 2016 at 8:22 am


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