Social Media Marketing for Web Writers: Are You Posting Enough?

There’s a delicate balance between posting too much and too little when it comes to using social media marketing to build relationships with prospects and clients.

Post too much and you’re like the socially awkward person who over-shares and makes people feel uncomfortable. Post too little, and nobody gets to know, like, or trust you.

So, as a web copywriter, how many posts should you publish each week to be an effective social media marketer?

Recommended Quantity of Social Media Posts

There are many different opinions about how often you should post on social media.

Inc.com recently reported research done by CoSchedule that compiled information from 10 different studies. Based on their data, here’s how often you should be posting:

  • Facebook: 1 post per day
  • Twitter: 15 Tweets per day
  • Pinterest: 11 Pins per day
  • LinkedIn: 1 post per day
  • Instagram: 1-2 posts per day

Now, these guidelines are intended for general social media marketing, not specifically B2B social media marketing for web copywriters. You may or may not use all of these platforms. That’s OK.

Start with the guidelines for the platform(s) you do use. Then test and keep track of what works best for your target audience.

What to Post About on Social Media

Equally important as the number of posts you publish on any specific social media platform is what you’re posting about.

Link Posts to Drive Traffic to Your Website

For example, it’s a common strategy to use social media to drive traffic to your website. You publish a post that’s a small teaser to a longer piece of content on your website, and you provide the link for the reader to learn more or to read the full article.

This is smart. It’s effective. And you can get multiple posts from a single piece of content.

Let’s use this article as an example. Different posts I might share that link to this article could include:

Post 1 – Are you posting too much or too little on social media as a web copywriter?

Post 2 – Hey, web copywriter … are you over-sharing on social media?

Post 3 – What? Are you not posting enough on social media as a web copywriter?

Post 4 – Finding the right balance on social media as a web copywriter …

Post 5 – How much SHOULD you post on social media as a web copywriter?

As you can see, coming up with five social media posts from this one article wasn’t hard to do. And, while I stopped at five, you just as easily could have kept going and gotten 10 or 15. All driving traffic back to this one article on your website, because you’ll include the same link in all of them.

Pair the post copy with different images for each, and you’re well on your way to an engaging, value-driven social media presence.

Note: These posts driving traffic to the same article shouldn’t be published on the same or even consecutive days, of course. You want to invoke curiosity and get your audience to click the link to learn more on your website, not block you for being spammy.

Link posts that drive traffic to an article on your website provide value by giving your audience additional knowledge and insights. They position you as a subject matter expert.

But, do they allow your audience to really get to know much about you?

For that you need …

Personality Posts to Build Connection

Consider adding a few posts that showcase who you are, as well. What causes do you support? What do you stand for … or against? What are some of your other interests or hobbies? What book are you reading? What music do you listen to? Are you a runner? Into yoga?

When your audience discovers they have additional things in common with you, it strengthens the bond between you. It builds a stronger relationship. And that’s definitely a good thing.

Be careful, though, about what you share to showcase your personality. Remember, this is your professional, business presence. Be authentic. Be yourself. But be the best version of yourself.

Promotional Posts to Grow Your Business

While it’s a good practice to give lots of value in order to build a relationship with your audience, the mistake some social media marketers make is never asking their audience to DO anything that will move them closer to being paying clients.

If you have a lead magnet you offer that puts subscribers into a follow-up sequence, post about it.

If you have a specific service or offer you want to promote — a website audit or a key message copy platform, for example — post about it.

Just remember that posting too many promotional posts is almost as bad as not posting any. If you annoy your audience with too many offers not balanced by posts that provide true value, you won’t build any quality relationships.

Effective social media marketing is more like a two-way conversation. It shouldn’t be treated like a one-way broadcast media or billboard.

Finding the Right Balance for Your Social Media Posts

To determine if you’re posting too much or too little of each kind of social media post, and to find a good balance, ask yourself these questions:

  • How much professional and/or industry information are you sharing?
  • How much are you posting about you as a person?
  • How much are you asking of your audience?
  • How much value are you giving?

If you’re posting only professional information, your audience isn’t getting to know YOU. They may be getting value from your content, but they’re probably not connecting with you.

If you post too much personal information (or inappropriately personal), on the other hand, your professional credibility may suffer.

Strive for a balance between professional and personal, between value-based and promotional. The exact number of each type of post that creates that balance may vary depending on the social media platform you’re using.

For example, on Facebook you may post two “personality” posts each week that let your audience get to know more about you personally. You may balance these personality posts with two professional/industry information posts, one promotional offer, and two “fun” entertaining or inspirational posts.

On LinkedIn, you may change that weekly recipe to one personality, three professional, two promotional, and one inspirational post.

Like any good chef, you’ll want to test your recipe — your posting blend — until you find what your audience likes best. Watch your analytics. The data will show what’s working and what’s not.

Quality vs. Quantity on Social Media

Did your grandma ever tell you, “If you don’t have anything good to say, don’t say anything at all”? Mine did. And I think of her advice when posting to social media.

If I don’t have something good to say … something that provides value, something that people will want to engage with, something that will prompt a conversation … I wait until I do. I don’t post just to post. And neither should you.

Quality social media content wins over simple quantity every time. When you combine quality with consistency and balance, that’s when the magic starts happening. That’s when you build strong relationships and turn your social media followers into clients.

That’s when you create community. That’s when you win … and so does your audience.

Do you have something to add about finding the right balance on social media? Tell me about it in a comment below!

This article, Social Media Marketing for Web Writers, was originally published by Wealthy Web Writer.

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Published: September 19, 2018

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